Famous Animals Throughout History

Nov 10

i’m very sorry everyone!

I haven’t been very active, but I hope to remedy that

And to help me do that I will be moving to a different blog!

It will be the same url, just a different accout.

www.fyeahanimalsinhistory.tumblr.com


Aug 14
Laika was a Soviet space dog that became the first animal to orbit the Earth – as well as the first animal to die in orbit.
As little was known about the impact of spaceflight  on living creatures at the time of Laika’s mission, and the technology  to de-orbit had not yet been developed, there was no expectation of  Laika’s survival. Some scientists believed humans would be unable to  survive the launch or the conditions of outer space, so engineers viewed  flights by non-human animals as a necessary precursor to human  missions. Laika, a stray dog, originally named Kudryavka, underwent training with two other dogs, and was eventually chosen as the occupant of the Soviet spacecraft Sputnik 2 that was launched into outer space on November 3, 1957.
Laika likely died within hours after launch from overheating, possibly caused by a failure of the central R-7 sustainer to separate from the payload.  The true cause and time of her death was not made public until 2002;  instead, it was widely reported that she died when her oxygen ran out on  day six, or (as Soviet government initially claimed) she was euthanised prior to  oxygen depletion. Nonetheless, the experiment proved that a living  passenger could survive being launched into orbit and endure wightlessness, paving the way for human spaceflight and providing scientists with some of the first data on how living organisms react to spaceflight environments.
On April 11, 2008, Russian officials unveiled a monument to Laika. A  small monument in her honour was built near the military research  facility in Moscow which prepared Laika’s flight to space. It features a  dog standing on top of a rocket.

Laika was a Soviet space dog that became the first animal to orbit the Earth – as well as the first animal to die in orbit.

As little was known about the impact of spaceflight on living creatures at the time of Laika’s mission, and the technology to de-orbit had not yet been developed, there was no expectation of Laika’s survival. Some scientists believed humans would be unable to survive the launch or the conditions of outer space, so engineers viewed flights by non-human animals as a necessary precursor to human missions. Laika, a stray dog, originally named Kudryavka, underwent training with two other dogs, and was eventually chosen as the occupant of the Soviet spacecraft Sputnik 2 that was launched into outer space on November 3, 1957.

Laika likely died within hours after launch from overheating, possibly caused by a failure of the central R-7 sustainer to separate from the payload. The true cause and time of her death was not made public until 2002; instead, it was widely reported that she died when her oxygen ran out on day six, or (as Soviet government initially claimed) she was euthanised prior to oxygen depletion. Nonetheless, the experiment proved that a living passenger could survive being launched into orbit and endure wightlessness, paving the way for human spaceflight and providing scientists with some of the first data on how living organisms react to spaceflight environments.

On April 11, 2008, Russian officials unveiled a monument to Laika. A small monument in her honour was built near the military research facility in Moscow which prepared Laika’s flight to space. It features a dog standing on top of a rocket.


Jul 29
Greyfriars Bobby was a Skye Terrier who became known in 19th-century Edinburgh after spending 14 years guarding the grave of his owner, John Gray, until he died himself on 14 January 1872. A year later, Lady Burdett-Coutts had a statue and fountain erected at the southern end of the George IV Bridge to commemorate him.
Several books and films have been based on Bobby’s life.

Greyfriars Bobby was a Skye Terrier who became known in 19th-century Edinburgh after spending 14 years guarding the grave of his owner, John Gray, until he died himself on 14 January 1872. A year later, Lady Burdett-Coutts had a statue and fountain erected at the southern end of the George IV Bridge to commemorate him.

Several books and films have been based on Bobby’s life.


Jul 26

I am now accepting requests!

I’m running out of ideas for animals to post, so if there is any animal you want to see, please, put them in my ask box! I’ll queue them up as soon as possible.


A12-week-old macaque - who was abandoned by his mother - was close to death when it was rescued on Neilingding Island, in Goangdong Province.
After being taken to an animal hospital his health began to improve but he seemed spiritless - until he developed a friendship with a white pigeon. The blossoming relationship helped to revive the macaque who  developed a new lease of life.

A12-week-old macaque - who was abandoned by his mother - was close to death when it was rescued on Neilingding Island, in Goangdong Province.

After being taken to an animal hospital his health began to improve but he seemed spiritless - until he developed a friendship with a white pigeon. The blossoming relationship helped to revive the macaque who  developed a new lease of life.


Jul 25
Checkers was one of the most famous dogs in political history, a cocker spaniel who belonged to Republican vice-presidential candidate Richard M. Nixon in 1952. Denying charges that he had accepted money from a secret political slush fund, Nixon gave a televised address insisting that the only gift he’d accepted was the family dog, Checkers, from a Texas admirer. The talk was a hit with the public, saved Nixon’s place as Dwight Eisenhower’s running mate, and soon became known as “the Checkers speech.” (It is also known as the “cloth coat speech” due to Nixon’s comment that his wife Pat wore only a “respectable Republican cloth coat.”) Because of its melodramatic and somewhat disingenuous nature, the speech is often recalled whenever a politician gives an emotional public defense of his or her actions.

Checkers was one of the most famous dogs in political history, a cocker spaniel who belonged to Republican vice-presidential candidate Richard M. Nixon in 1952. Denying charges that he had accepted money from a secret political slush fund, Nixon gave a televised address insisting that the only gift he’d accepted was the family dog, Checkers, from a Texas admirer. The talk was a hit with the public, saved Nixon’s place as Dwight Eisenhower’s running mate, and soon became known as “the Checkers speech.” (It is also known as the “cloth coat speech” due to Nixon’s comment that his wife Pat wore only a “respectable Republican cloth coat.”) Because of its melodramatic and somewhat disingenuous nature, the speech is often recalled whenever a politician gives an emotional public defense of his or her actions.


Jul 6
Goldie was a male golden eagle who lived at London Zoo in the United Kingdom during the 1960s. Goldie flew away from his keepers while his cage was being cleaned in Febuary 1965. He avoided being recaptured for nearly two weeks, despite a massive effort using equipment borrowed from the Royal Navy and British Civil Defence. Goldie spent most of the time in Regent’s Park, which surrounds the zoo, but he also made excursions into the nearby neighbourhoods of Camden Town, Tottenham Court Road and Euston.
Goldie’s escape enthralled the British public. The zoo received thousands of phone calls and letters, and large crowds gathered in Regent’s Park to watch the bird’s keepers trying to catch him. There were severe traffic jams in the area as drivers circled the park, watching Goldie in flight.
The saga was closely covered by the media. On a BBC BBC television programme, the reporter John Timpson unsuccessfully tried to lure Goldie by playing an Ethiopian bird pipe. Goldie was also mentioned during a debate in the House of Commons, where Members of Parliament greeted his name with cheers.
Goldie was finally caught on 11 March after the zoo’s deputy head keeper tempted him to earth with a dead rabbit. He was in good health after his experience and was reunited with his mate, Regina. The zoo’s attendance nearly doubled in the days after his return.

Goldie was a male golden eagle who lived at London Zoo in the United Kingdom during the 1960s. Goldie flew away from his keepers while his cage was being cleaned in Febuary 1965. He avoided being recaptured for nearly two weeks, despite a massive effort using equipment borrowed from the Royal Navy and British Civil Defence. Goldie spent most of the time in Regent’s Park, which surrounds the zoo, but he also made excursions into the nearby neighbourhoods of Camden Town, Tottenham Court Road and Euston.

Goldie’s escape enthralled the British public. The zoo received thousands of phone calls and letters, and large crowds gathered in Regent’s Park to watch the bird’s keepers trying to catch him. There were severe traffic jams in the area as drivers circled the park, watching Goldie in flight.

The saga was closely covered by the media. On a BBC BBC television programme, the reporter John Timpson unsuccessfully tried to lure Goldie by playing an Ethiopian bird pipe. Goldie was also mentioned during a debate in the House of Commons, where Members of Parliament greeted his name with cheers.

Goldie was finally caught on 11 March after the zoo’s deputy head keeper tempted him to earth with a dead rabbit. He was in good health after his experience and was reunited with his mate, Regina. The zoo’s attendance nearly doubled in the days after his return.


Jul 4
K9C Sinbad, USCG, Retired (b. around 1937, d. 30 December 1951) was a mixed-breed canine sailor aboard the US Coast Guard Cutter George W. Campbell. Sinbad holds the distinction of having been enlisted in the United States Military, serving 11 years sea duty including combat in WWII, never having an owner or master, and having been the only Coastguardsman to be the subject of a biography until the dawn of the twenty-first century.

K9C Sinbad, USCG, Retired (b. around 1937, d. 30 December 1951) was a mixed-breed canine sailor aboard the US Coast Guard Cutter George W. Campbell. Sinbad holds the distinction of having been enlisted in the United States Military, serving 11 years sea duty including combat in WWII, never having an owner or master, and having been the only Coastguardsman to be the subject of a biography until the dawn of the twenty-first century.


Jun 21
Lin Wang (1917 – February 26, 2003) was a famous Asian elephant that served with the Chinese Expiditionary Force during the Second Sino-Japanese War (1937–1945) and was later relocated to Taiwan with the Kuomintang forces. Lin Wang lived out most of his life in the Taipei Zoo and unquestionably was the most popular and famous animal in Taiwan. Many adults and children alike affectionately called the bull elephant “Grandpa Lin Wang.”

Lin Wang (1917 – February 26, 2003) was a famous Asian elephant that served with the Chinese Expiditionary Force during the Second Sino-Japanese War (1937–1945) and was later relocated to Taiwan with the Kuomintang forces. Lin Wang lived out most of his life in the Taipei Zoo and unquestionably was the most popular and famous animal in Taiwan. Many adults and children alike affectionately called the bull elephant “Grandpa Lin Wang.”


Jun 15
Secretariat (March 30, 1970 – October 4, 1989) was an American Thoroughbred racehorse, that in 1973 became the first US Triple Crown champion in twenty-five years, setting new race records in two of the three events in the Series—the Kentucky Derby, and the Belmont Stakes—records that still stand today.
In the fall of 1989, Secretariat was afflicted with laminitis, a painful and often incurable hoof condition. When his condition failed to improve after a month of treatment, he was euthanized on October 4 at the age of 19. Popular both as a Triple Crown champion and in retirement, Secretariat was mourned by millions and buried in Paris, Kentucky, given the rare honor of being buried whole. (usually only the head, heart, and hooves of a winning race horse are buried, and the rest of the body is cremated.)

Secretariat (March 30, 1970 – October 4, 1989) was an American Thoroughbred racehorse, that in 1973 became the first US Triple Crown champion in twenty-five years, setting new race records in two of the three events in the Series—the Kentucky Derby, and the Belmont Stakes—records that still stand today.

In the fall of 1989, Secretariat was afflicted with laminitis, a painful and often incurable hoof condition. When his condition failed to improve after a month of treatment, he was euthanized on October 4 at the age of 19. Popular both as a Triple Crown champion and in retirement, Secretariat was mourned by millions and buried in Paris, Kentucky, given the rare honor of being buried whole. (usually only the head, heart, and hooves of a winning race horse are buried, and the rest of the body is cremated.)


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